Midwest Marketing Telemarketing Scam

Damone Jackson initiated the telemarketing scam in Chicago, Illinois under the name “Midwest Marketing” (“Midwest”). Damone Jackson, who lived in Los Angeles and ran another telemarketing company there, recruited his nephew, Mark Jackson, then age eighteen, to oversee Midwest Marketing’s operations in Chicago. Although Damone owned the Chicago company, received the funds collected, and sent employee pay checks from California, Mark Jackson was in charge of hiring, firing, and supervising Midwest Marketing employees in Chicago. He also handled “customer complaints.” After Mark Jackson initially worked for Midwest Marketing for about two months, the Chicago operations ceased until he again started up the business in August or September of 1990. Kerry Stephans began working for Midwest Marketing in September of 1990 and worked through January of 1991. In October of 1990, Damone Jackson decided to expand Midwest Marketing’s business, and he and Mark Jackson hired additional telemarketers to work for them in Chicago. Midwest Marketing remained in business until April of 1991.

While the exact nature of the scheme varied over time, the “prizes” changed somewhat, and different company names were used, the Midwest program basically worked as follows Continue reading “Midwest Marketing Telemarketing Scam”

Telemarketing Scam Contest Winner

The scheme itself was simple. Callers, hired by Alfred Greene, Jr., and Richard Leonard, used phone lines set up in a suite of small offices in the Houston area to contact elderly citizens located across the country and inform them that their names had been selected by a committee to receive one of four awards. These individuals, whose identities had been purchased from a mail order company, were read to from a pre-designed script and told that they had already been chosen to receive either first prize of $15,000.00 cash; second prize consisting of a diamond and sapphire pendant; third prize which was a large-screen Sony television; or, fourth prize consisting of $1,000.00 cash. The pendant, the only prize ever given out, was designated as second prize so that the victim would think it the second-most valuable item after the $15,000.00. In fact, a portion of the script anticipated questions as to the value of the pendant and was designed to mislead the person to believe that the jewelry, later appraised for $15.00, was worth between $2,000.00 and $2,500.00. To obtain the prize, the victim was informed Continue reading “Telemarketing Scam Contest Winner”